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TV/FILM

February 2018

 
 
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RECOMMENDED: Black Panther  

From Marvel comes the highly anticipated film, Black Panther. The film follows the journey of the new leader of the technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda, King T’Challa (played by Chadwick Boseman), as he fights to combat chaos brought by the hands of old enemies. Exploring ideas of morality and spirituality, the movie has quite the reputation to live up to considering audiences who have never even seen the film (which premiered January 29th in Hollywood) are already calling it "the greatest movie of all time". But with a cast like this one (Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong'o, Danai Gurira, Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett) this is so much more than a tale-as-old-as-time battle of “good vs. evil”  and the reactions of those at the premiere were charged with nothing but excitement and hope.   

The Black Panther is set to hit theaters February 16th.

 


ICYMI (In Case You Missed It): Crashing, Season 2  

Back on HBO for its second season is Crashing, the comedic love-child of stand-up comedian Pete Holmes and writer/producer Judd Apatow. Pulling from events that happened in Pete’s own life, Crashing follows a comedian, recently separated and living on friends’ couches, as he makes a new start in New York City. Having grown up with a Evangelical Christian background, the comedian (played by Pete Holmes himself) navigates this new phase in his life and everything that comes with it-  the spiritual, the comedic, and the spiritually comedic. Season one aired in February of last year and did remarkably well, scoring a 90% on Rotten Tomatoes. You can hear Pete Holmes talk about the series and its backstory with Rob Bell on Rob’s weekly podcast “The RobCast”, and you can catch the show on HBO.


OF CONSEQUENCE  

Movies and TV Shows that people will be talking about this month. 

The Post / 20th Century Fox

A box containing highly confidential government studies are dropped off anonymously at The Washington Post where Kay Graham (Meryl Streep) is fighting to keep the struggling local-at the time- paper afloat. Alongside her newly hired editor (Tom Hanks), Graham must decide whether or not to publish what are now known as the Pentagon Papers. A Steven Spielberg film, The Post is a timely piece grappling with all too relevant issues such as the relationship between the press and the executive branch, and women in the American workplace.